Catalyst on Debian


Because Catalyst is a rapidly evolving project, packages supplied by operating system vendors like Debian, Fedora, Ubuntu, and many others have historically been outdated compared to the stable versions. In effect, this limited users of Debian's package management system to outdated versions of this software.

In 2009, thanks to the efforts of Matt S Trout and many others, Debian's Catalyst packages have been improving. The idea that Debian's Perl packages are outdated is an idea that is itself becoming obsolete. There are many situations where system-wide Debian packages (and similarly, Ubuntu packages) can be preferable to installing software manually via CPAN.


Here are some reasons why packages managed by Debian are preferable to installing packages manually:

  • Unattended installation: the majority of our packages require absolutely no user interaction during installation, in contrast to installs via CPAN.
  • Quicker installs for binary packages: since binary packages are pre-built, installing the package is as simple as unpacking the package and installing the files to the appropriate locations. When many modules need to be built (as with Catalyst and MojoMojo), this can result in a significant time savings, especially when one considers rebuilding due to upgrades.
  • No unnecessary updates: if an update only affects the Win32 platform, for example, it does not make sense to waste bandwidth downloading and installing it. Our process separates packages with bugfixes and feature additions from those that have no functional difference to users, saving time, bandwidth, and administrative overhead.
  • Only packages offered by Debian are supported by Debian: if there are bugs in your Debian software, it is our responsibility to help identify and correct them. Often this means coordinating with the upstream software developers (i.e. the Catalyst community) and working toward a solution together - but our team takes care of this on your behalf.
  • Updates occur with the rest of your system: while upgrading your system using aptitude, synaptic, or another package management tool, your Perl packages will be updated as well. This prevents issues where a system administrator forgets to update CPAN packages periodically, leaving your systems vulnerable to potential security issues.
  • Important changes are always indicated during package upgrades: if there are changes to the API of a library which can potentially break applications, a supplied Debian.NEWS file will display a notice (either in a dialog box or on the command line) indicating these changes. You will need to install the "apt-listchanges" utility to see these.

This year has seen greatly improved interaction between the Debian Perl Group and the Catalyst community, which is a trend we'd like to see continue for many years to come. As with any open source project, communicating the needs of both communities and continuing to work together as partners will ultimately yield the greatest benefit for everyone.


As with all good things, there are naturally some situations where using Debian Perl packages (or, indeed, most operating-system managed packages) is either impossible, impractical, or undesirable.

  • Inadequate granularity: due to some restrictions on the size of packages being uploaded into Debian, there are plenty of module "bundles", including the main Catalyst module bundle (libcatalyst-modules-perl). Unfortunately, this means you may have more things installed than you need.
  • Not installable as non-root: if you don't have root on the system, or a friendly system administrator, you simply cannot install Debian packages, let alone our Perl packages. This can add to complexity for shared hosting scenarios where using our packages would require some virtualization.
  • Multiple versions: with a solution like local::lib, it's possible to install multiple versions of the same package in different locations. This can be important for a number of reasons, including ease of testing and to support your legacy applications. With operating-system based packages, you will always have the most recent version available (and if you are using the stable release, you will always have the most recent serious bug/security fixes installed).
  • Less useful in a non-homogeneous environment: if you use different operating systems, it can be easier to maintain a single internal CPAN mirror (especially a mini-CPAN installation) than a Debian repository, Ubuntu repository, Fedora/RedHat repository, etc.

For my purposes, I use Debian packages for everything because the benefits outweigh the perceived costs. However, this is not the case for everyone in all situations, so it is important to understand that Debian Perl packages are not a panacea.

Quality Assurance

The Debian Perl Group uses several tools to provide quality assurance for our users. Chief among them is the Package Entropy Tracker (PET), a dashboard that shows information like the newest upstream versions of modules. Our bug reports are available in Debian's open bug reporting system.

If you have any requests for Catalyst-related modules (or other Perl modules) that you'd like packaged for Debian, please either contact me directly (via IRC or email) or file a "Request For Package" (RFP) bug. If you have general questions or would like to chat with us, you're welcome to visit us at any time - we hang around on, #debian-perl.


  • Our IRC channel, (OFTC), channel #debian-perl
  • Package Entropy Tracker ( is a dashboard where we can see what needs to be updated. It allows us (and others, if interested!) to easily monitor our workflow, and also contains links to our repository.
  • Our welcome page ( talks about what we do and how you (yes you!) can join. You don't need to be a Debian Developer to join the group (actually, I'm not yet a DD and yet I maintain 300+ packages through the group).
  • This guide ( explains how to file a Request For Package (RFP) bug, so that the modules you use can be added to the Debian archive. Note that Debian is subject to many restrictions, so issues like inadequate copyright information may prevent the package from entering the archive.


Here are some statistics of note:


Jonathan Yu <>


Thanks to Matt S Trout (mst) for working so closely with the group to help both communities achieve our goal of increasing Catalyst's profile. Also thanks to Bogdan Lucaciu (zamolxes) for inviting us to contribute this article, and Florian Ragwitz (rafl) for his review and feedback.

Everything that is good in nature comes from cooperation. Neither Catalyst, nor Perl, nor Debian Perl packages could exist without the contributions of countless others. We all stand on the shoulders of giants.